Last edited by Tausida
Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

8 edition of Dyes from American Native Plants found in the catalog.

Dyes from American Native Plants

A Practical Guide

by Lynne Richards

  • 251 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Timber Press, Incorporated .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Technology & Industrial Arts,
  • Engineering - Chemical & Biochemical,
  • Dye,
  • Crafts & Hobbies,
  • Crafts / Hobbies,
  • Hobbies/Crafts,
  • United States,
  • Crafts & Hobbies / Dye,
  • Science / Botany,
  • Dye plants,
  • Dyes and dyeing

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages340
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8176388M
    ISBN 10088192668X
    ISBN 109780881926682

    American Native Plants is committed to growing and distributing native plants that are critical to the establishment of biodiverse natural ecosystems. Since , we have provided millions of plants to landscapers and contractors throughout the mid-Atlantic region and beyond. Dye Plants Dyes from American Native Plants: A Practical Guide - Lynne Richards This book is a really thorough resource and one of my favorites for dye plants native to America. A Dyer's Garden: From Plant to Pot: Growing Dyes for Natural Fibers - Rita Buchanan This is a standard little book for a lot of natural dyers to begin.

      Book review: Dyes from Native American Plants Posted on Aug by arlee (I reviewed this on my old blog, but thought it worth repeating here, with a few edits.). American Indian Herbs, Dyes, and Medicine Plants. Some American Indian goods available for sale are not crafts per se, but rather traditional plant and animal products-- native herbs and spices like sage, tobacco, and sweetgrass, foods like wild rice and tea, traditional plant-based dyes and paints, and animal parts like tanned buckskin, feathers, and elk's teeth.

    The online database, and the book mentioned above, were largely completed in the late s. The database now conta items. This version added foods, drugs, dyes, fibers and other uses of plants (a total of o items). This represents uses by Native American groups of 4, species from different plant families. Simply written text, accompanied by detailed line illustrations of plants, explains how to select and mix natural colors of wool and prepare "recipes" for producing specific colors of dye from desert plants, among them single-flowered actinea for yellow, alder bark for a soft brown, the Rocky Mountain bee plant for a pale greenish yellow, more.


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Dyes from American Native Plants by Lynne Richards Download PDF EPUB FB2

Dyes from native plants offer a special source of satisfaction and beauty. In this fascinating book, the authors have compiled extensive information to bring the techniques, plants, and lore of natural dyeing within every reader's reach. Chapters include discussions of color theory, dye equipment, dye processes, mordants, and easy-to-follow Cited by: 5.

Dyes from American Native Plants book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The dyeing of textiles and other materials is a rew /5. Which leads me to one of my quibbles with this book: it concentrates on the Eastern and Mid-West portions of the United States, and leaves out many dye plants common to the western states.

Artimesia californica (California Sagebrush), all the Quercus species (California oaks) - these are the most notable for my area/5(8). 42 rows  Native North American Plants Used for Dyes. European settlers in North America. Get this from a library.

Dyes from American native plants: a practical guide. [Lynne Richards; Ronald J Tyrl] -- "The dyeing of textiles and other materials is a rewarding and delightful way to bring the colors of nature to daily living. In our technological.

Dyes from American Native Plants: A Practical Guide by Lynne Richards () [Lynne Richards;Ronald J. Tyrl] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Dyes from American Native Plants: A Practical Guide by Lynne Richards ()/5(9). The book is organized seasonally; as an added bonus, each section contains a knitting project using wools colored with dyes from plants harvested during that time of the year.

With breathtaking color photographs by Paige Green throughout, Gathering Color is an essential guide to this growing field, for crafters and DIYers; for ecologists and /5(78).

Dyes from American Native Plants: A Practical Guide by Lynne Richards () on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers/5(9). This book contains extensive color charts based on the plant, the part of the plant used, and the mordant used.

An excellent, possibly essential reference book for natural dyers. If you are not interested in dyeing, it might not be the book for you.

It is exclusive to (Northern) American plants. Dyes from native plants offer a special source of satisfaction and beauty. In this fascinating book, the authors have compiled extensive information to bring the techniques, plants, and lore of natural dyeing within every reader's reach.

Chapters include discussions of color theory, dye equipment, dye processes, mordants, and easy-to-follow /5(8). Dyes from American Native Plants: A Practical Guide by Lynne Richards, Ronald J. Tyrl Hardcover Book, pages See Other Available Editions Description The dyeing of textiles and other materials is a rewarding and delightful way to bring the colors of nature to daily : Native Dye Plants of the United States By Kathy J.

Ogg The first to use native dye plants in the United States were the Native Americans. Their culture was totally dependent on what the land produced. This is reflected in the wealth of information Native Americans possessed about useful plants, from medicinal to ceremonial and dye plants.

should be able to iterate the cultural traditions of Native Americans and settlers with regard to the use of natural dyes, and remark on the changes that took place after technology offered synthetic dyes and pre-dyed cloth for sale or trade, and whether this had any impact on the disappearance of prairie, forest, and dye-source plants.

We certainly aren't experts on dyes made from native plants but we can perhaps help you become one. First, if you haven't seen or don't have a copy of Dyes from American Native Plants: A Practical Guide by Lynne Richards and Ronald J.

Tyrl, you should try to locate a copy. It gives information about native plants that have been used to make. Dyes from American Native Plants: A Practical Guide • Lynn Richards & Ronald J.

Tyrl (author) • • Natural Dyes and Home Dying • Rita J. Adrosko (author) • • Nature's Colors: Dyes from Plants • Ida Grae (author) • • North American Dye Plants • Anne & Robert Bliss (author) • • Ecology.

book review: Dyes from American Native Plants 30 Nov. a lot of the wild plants mentioned are widespread in North America, even up to Alberta. It does miss out on a few plants in the same species, but given again that it is geo-specific, that may be why–one variety in the species grows there, but not others.

Dyes and Pigments Used by Indians [This text was originally published in by the Bureau of American Ethnology as part of its Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. It was later reproduced, inby the Geographic Board of Canada. Blue elderberry is among the many native plants that have been used to make traditional dyes.

Photo: Jim Freed/WSU Extension. Many people who own forestland are looking for new ways to use the native plants that grow there. One project would be to learn which plants will produce natural dyes and how to use them to produce finished items. The historical use of culturally significant plants is of interest to many Tribal peoples and to the general public.

Many plants the Native Americans used were also used by pioneers and early settlers. The following document highlights how Native American Indians and early settlers used some of the plants that were available to them. NativeFile Size: 2MB.

Dyes from American native plants: a practical guide, Lynne Richards and Ronald J. Tyrl. X (hardcover), Toronto Public Library. The Hopi, how ever, have a larger number of native dyes for basketry splints than any other tribe, and the Apache, Walapai, and Havasupai have a number of vegetal dyes that are not used in basketry.

The Abnaki and other tribes made fugitive stains from poke-berries and fruits of the blueberry and elder.Celebrating Wildflowers provides a variety of colorful and interesting articles, photos, posters, interpretive panels, and activities about wildflowers, pollinators, our native plants, and links to other sources of this information.Osage orange is a fruit-bearing tree in the mulberry family that is native to an area in the central United States.

A yellow-orange dye pigment is extracted from the wood of this tree to substitute for fustic and aniline dyes.

Madder. The Common Madder is a perennial plant that is native to the Old World, Africa, temperate Asia, and America.